Beatitudes, part 7: Blessed are the Peacemakers

The Beatitudes exemplify virtues that God deems worthwhile.  As can be expected, these are not virtues that the world would identify as virtuous.

The first four Beatitudes are felt needs:  poor in spirit, mourning, meek, those who hunger and thirst for righteousness.

The next three are states of being:  merciful, pure in heart, and the peacemakers.  The merciful are granted mercy, the pure in heart see God, but the peacemakers are called sons of God.

Paul wrote to the Romans that the kingdom of God isn’t about rules and trifles.  It’s about peace and joy in the Holy Spirit.  “Whoever thus serves Christ is acceptable to God and approved by men.  So then let us pursue what makes for peace and for mutual upbuilding” (Rom 14:18-19).  In his second letter to the Corinthians, Paul instructs believers to “[a]im for restoration, comfort one another, agree with one another, live in peace; and the God of love and peace will be with you” (2 Cor 13:11).

God will be with you if you live in peace and comfort one another.  Paul instructs us “with humility of mind [to] regard one another as more important than yourselves . . .” (Phil 2:3).  Being a peacemaker is about living an others-centered existence.

The peacemaker draws closer to God with each step, and James tells us that if we draw near to God he will also draw nearer to us (Jms 4:8).

This isn’t to say that we should let ourselves get stepped on, kicked and beaten.  Christian nations shouldn’t disarm themselves unilaterally.  After all, the apostle Paul qualifies that we should live at peace as much as it depends on us (Rom 12:18).  Let’s not go looking for fights, and let’s forgive as often as we are wronged (Mt 18:22).  Then we will truly be children of God.

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About Cory Tucholski

I'm a born-again Christian who prays that this blog will be used solely for furthering God's plan of salvation and for His glory. See my "About Us" page for further information about me and about my wife.

Posted on March 6, 2012, in God, Religion and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

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